Renter’s assistance funds set aside during the pandemic running out

>> WHAT AM I GOING TO DO? YOU KNOW WHAT I MEAN? SO YOU NEED RENTAL ASSISTANCE, IT IS NECESSARY. LISA: RICHARD TOWSON MIGHT BE EVICTED IN FEBRUARY. HE FIRED — FILED FOR RENTAL IS ASSISTANCE BUT HAS NOT COME OUT YET. HE OWES MORE THAN $5,000 BACKGROUND. HE HAS CANCER AND CANNOT WORK AROUND PEOPLE BECAUSE OF COVID AND HE LOST HIS JOB. ALBERT TURNER IS AN ATTORNEY WITH THE PUBLIC JUSTICE CENTER. HE SAYS RENTAL ASSISTANCE WAS DESIGNED TO HELP PEOPLE LIKE TOWSON IN 2020. >> BECAUSE OF COVID AND BECAUSE OF THAT THEY WERE BEHIND ON THEIR RANCH. A LOT OF MONEY WAS ALLOCATED TO THE STATE GOVERNMENT TO EACH JURISDICTION TO HELP PAY TENANTS BACK RENT. >> I JUST NEED A LITTLE HELP TO GET ME OVER. IF I GET THIS JOB, WITHIN A COUPLE OF WEEKS, I WILL BE WORKING, MAKING MONEY AND I CAN PAY. I HAVE NEVER BEEN IN THIS SITUATION IN MY WHOLE 60 SOMETHING YEARS. >> BALTIMORE GOT 80 ALIEN — MILLION DOLLARS. LISA: WITH INFLATION RENT HAS GOTTEN HIGHER IN THE MONEY MIGHT BE GONE BY MARCH. >> THAT MONEY DRYING UP, WE ARE LOOKING AT AN EXTREMELY HIGH PROBABILITY OF A MASS EVICTION CRISIS. LISA: CHRISTINA WITH THE MAYOR’S OFFICE OF CHILDREN AND FAMILY SUCCESS SENT 11 NEWS THIS STATEMENT. IF THE CITY OF BALTIMORE IS PURSUING FUNDS RECAPTURED FROM OTHER JURISDICTIONS BY THE US DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY TO CONTINUE TO SUPPORT RESIDENTS FACING EVICTION IN BALTIMORE AND CONTINUE OUR EVICTION PREVENTION EFFORTS. NOW IF YOU WANT TO GO ONLINE AND SIGN UP FOR RENTAL ASSISTANCE, YOU CAN GO TO BMORE CHILDREN.COM.

Funds set aside for renter’s assistance during the pandemic running out

Funds set aside during the COVID-19 pandemic to help keep rental residents in their homes is running out amid increasing rents. Richard Towson, 66, might be evicted in February. He filed for renter’s assistance but hasn’t received it yet. Towson has cancer and could not work around people because of COVID-19, so he lost his job. He owes more than $5,000 in back rent RELATED: Landlords say they face threats while trying to collect rent amid pandemic “I just need a little help, just to get me over. I have never been in this situation in my whole 66 years,” Towson said. Albert Turner, an attorney with the Public Justice Center, told 11 News that rental assistance was designed in 2020 to help people like Towson.”Because of COVID, they were behind on their rent, and so a lot of money was allocated from the federal government and state to jurisdictions to help pay tenants’ back rent,” Turner said. “The city of Baltimore got about $84 million. As of yesterday, only $7 million are left.”| RELATED: Average rents in Baltimore area higher than mortgage payment, Zillow says Amid inflation, rent has increased significantly, and the money might be gone by March, Turner said.”With that money drying up, we are looking at an extremely high priority of a mass eviction crisis,” Turner said. Baltimore Mayor’s Office of Children and Family Success spokeswoman Kristina Gilchrist sent a statement to 11 News, saying: “The city of Baltimore is pursuing funds recaptured from other jurisdictions by the US Department of the Treasury to continue to support residents facing eviction in Baltimore and to continue our eviction prevention efforts.” Tap here to apply for rental assistance from the Mayor’s Office of Children and Family Success.

Funds set aside during the COVID-19 pandemic to help keep rental residents in their homes is running out amid increasing rents.

Richard Towson, 66, might be evicted in February. He filed for renter’s assistance but hasn’t received it yet. Towson has cancer and could not work around people because of COVID-19, so he lost his job. He owes more than $5,000 in back rent.

| RELATED: Landlords say they face threats while trying to collect rent amid pandemic

“I just need a little help, just to get me over. I have never been in this situation in my entire 66 years,” Towson said.

Albert Turner, an attorney with the Public Justice Center, told 11 News that rental assistance was designed in 2020 to help people like Towson.

“Because of COVID, they were behind on their rent, and so a lot of money was allocated from the federal government and state to jurisdictions to help pay tenants’ back rent,” Turner said. “The city of Baltimore got about $84 million. As of yesterday, only $7 million are left.”

| RELATED: Average rents in Baltimore area higher than mortgage payments, Zillow says

Amid inflation, rent has increased significantly, and the money might be gone by March, Turner said.

“With that money drying up, we are looking at an extremely high priority of a mass eviction crisis,” Turner said.

Baltimore Mayor’s Office of Children and Family Success spokeswoman Kristina Gilchrist sent a statement to 11 News, saying: “The city of Baltimore is pursuing funds recaptured from other jurisdictions by the US Department of the Treasury to continue to support residents facing eviction in Baltimore and to continue our eviction prevention efforts.”

Tap here to apply for rental assistance from the Mayor’s Office of Children and Family Success.

.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

%d bloggers like this: